Chapter 17. Fabrication of Ceramics with Designed Porosity

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. R. W. Rice

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch17

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Rice, R. W. (2008) Fabrication of Ceramics with Designed Porosity, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch17

Author Information

  1. Consultant 5411, Hopark Dr. Alexandria, VA 22310

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • fabrication of ceramics;
  • fabrication techniques;
  • honeycomb extrusion;
  • porous ceramics;
  • porosity

Summary

Fabrication techniques for making bodies of designed, including graded, pore structures of interest for various catalytic, sensor, electrical, and some possible structural uses are reviewed. Factors such as the amount and character of porosity are addressed along with gradients of pore structure and of the mixes of pore structures are considered. Emerging methods such as solid free form fabrication (SFF), for growing porous structures in some single crystals, and methods of special pore structure fabrication such as electrophoretic deposition are discussed along with techniques for more typical fabrication of pore structures and aspects of their practicality. Typical fabrication methods include limited sintering, removal of fugitive material, honeycomb extrusion, foaming, and more diverse techniques of making various solid or porous particles by conventional fabrication that can then be formed and bonded to produce a variety of bodies of mixed porous structures. Some other less developed fabrication techniques are also noted.