Chapter 2. Radio Frequency Drying of Ceramics

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Ben Wilson

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch2

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Wilson, B. (2002) Radio Frequency Drying of Ceramics, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch2

Author Information

  1. PSC, inc. 21761 Tungsten Road Cleveland, OH 44117

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • ceramics;
  • radio frequency drying;
  • moisture;
  • heating;
  • ceramic drying process

Summary

Faster and more consistent drying is a common goal in today's ceramics industry. The use of Radio Frequency (RF) drying can offer many benefits over conventional drying, including faster drying, more uniform temperature gradients and moisture levels, lower drying temperature, and smaller equipment. Radio Frequency drying can be used alone or better yet it can be combined with conventional methods to get the best of both worlds. This paper will review how RF drying works, the benefits of RF drying, and hybrid RF–convection drying systems.