Chapter 27. Designing and Fabricating Pores in Porous Materials

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Elis Carlström,
  2. Cathrine Engebretsen and
  3. Erik Adolfsson

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch27

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Carlström, E., Engebretsen, C. and Adolfsson, E. (2002) Designing and Fabricating Pores in Porous Materials, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch27

Author Information

  1. Swedish Ceramic Institute, Box 5403, SE–402 29 Göteborg, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • porosity;
  • thermal shock resistance;
  • silicon nitride ceramics;
  • waterquenching technique;
  • porous ceramics

Summary

The most common way to create porous materials is by using coarse powders or lower temperatures to create partial sintering. In such materials, there is a wide variety of pore shapes and sizes. By adding fugitive particles, better control over morphology and pore sizes can be achieved. Starches can be used as fugitive particles to add equiaxed pores with a relatively narrow pore size distribution. Anionic latex binders can cause porosity in tape casting. Pores created in this way will form channels perpendicular to the casting direction.

By using indirect freeform methods, it is possible to design and fabricate porous systems with morphologies that have not been achievable before. A model of the desired porous structure is built in a rapid prototyping machine using a polymer as a building material. A ceramic slurry is infiltrated into the polymer model of the pore system and consolidated. The polymer model is then pyrolysed and the ceramic body is sintered.