Chapter 50. Microstructure and Performance of New Metal Glass Composite TBC

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Markus Dietrich,
  2. Vadim Verlotski,
  3. Robert Vaßen and
  4. Detlev Stover

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch50

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Dietrich, M., Verlotski, V., Vaßen, R. and Stover, D. (2002) Microstructure and Performance of New Metal Glass Composite TBC, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch50

Author Information

  1. Institut fur Werkstoffe und Verfahren der Energietechnik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D–52425 Jülich, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • thermal barrier coatings;
  • metal-glass composite;
  • plasma sprayed coatings;
  • metal-glass powders;
  • thermal expansion coefficient

Summary

A new concept of thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is presented, based on a metal-glass composite (MGC). Plasma sprayed coatings have been produced by either spraying of a premixed metal-glass powders or by co-spraying of separate glass and metal powder. The parameters of these two process methods have been optimized. The microstructure and the properties of the resulting coatings were compared. During subsequent thermal treatment, the as plasma sprayed metal-glass coatings are subjected to phase evolution, especially crystallization of the glass phase. This evolution has been studied in detail by X–ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. Another possibility for the deposition of MGC coatings is slip casting with a subsequent sintering step. For this deposition method, the research interest was on the examination of different slurries with a variation in the solid content and the binder type.

The thermal expansion coefficient of the metal glass composite can be tailored to the thermal expansion of the substrate by varying the metal-glass ratio. This leads to reduced thermal stresses and improved thermal cycling life times. Coatings of more than 600 μm thickness can be produced, with a good high temperature performance, because of the low thermal expansion mismatch. Another advantage of the gas tight composite coatings is their ability to protect the bond coat from severe oxidation. Correspondingly, long life times have been found for these TBCs in oxidation tests.