Chapter 62. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Nasicon Powders and Thin Films

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. S. V. Kesapragada1,
  2. S. Bhaduri1,
  3. S. B. Bhaduri1,
  4. E. G. Baburaj1 and
  5. P. A. Lessing2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch62

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Kesapragada, S. V., Bhaduri, S., Bhaduri, S. B., Baburaj, E. G. and Lessing, P. A. (2008) Preparation and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Nasicon Powders and Thin Films, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch62

Author Information

  1. 1

    Nanomaterials and Advanced Ceramics Lab University of Idaho, Moscow, ID–83844

  2. 2

    Ceramics Section, INEEL, Idaho Falls, ID–83415

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • na superionic conductor;
  • sodium ionic ceramic conductors;
  • stoichiometries;
  • thin films;
  • nanocrystalline powders

Summary

NASICON (Na superionic conductor) is a well-known family of sodium ionic ceramic conductors, with a large range of stoichiometries Na1+xZixSixP3–xO12 with 0<x<3. This paper reports the synthesis of nanocrystalline NASICON powders and thin films by two reactive processes. Nanocrystalline NASICON powders were prepared by the auto ignition synthesis. An aqueous solution containing stoichiometric amounts of sodium nitrate, zirconyl nitrate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium perchlorate, fumed silica and urea was used. The powders were characterized by X–Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Phase formation was determined by XRD analysis. The heat-treated powders were nanocrystalline, with the particle size ranging from 10 to 50 nm as determined by the TEM studies. NASICON thin films were produced by a Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) technique using the above combustion precursors. The as produced thin films were further characterized by XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).