Chapter 64. Comparative Investigation of A12O3– and ZrO2 Nanopowders Synthesized by Different Methods

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Stephan Appel1,
  2. Rolf Clasen1,
  3. Andrei Chkourankov2,
  4. Harald Natter2,
  5. Rolf Hempelmann2,
  6. Sabine Schlabach3,
  7. Bin Xu3 and
  8. Dieter Vollath3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch64

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Appel, S., Clasen, R., Chkourankov, A., Natter, H., Hempelmann, R., Schlabach, S., Xu, B. and Vollath, D. (2002) Comparative Investigation of A12O3– and ZrO2 Nanopowders Synthesized by Different Methods, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch64

Author Information

  1. 1

    Saarland University Department of Powder Technology Im Stadtwald, Building 43 D–66123 Saarbrücken, Germany

  2. 2

    Saarland University Physical Chemistry lm Stadtwald, Building 9 D–66123 Saarbrücken, Germany

  3. 3

    IMF III, Research Center Karlsruhe P. 0. Box 3640 D–76021 Karlsruhe Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • nanosized powders;
  • alumina powders;
  • zirconia powders;
  • phase transition;
  • crystalline structure

Summary

Nanosized powders offer new possibilities for the preparation of advanced materials. Therefore these powders should show certain properties like shape, density and phase composition. Different nanosized alumina and zirconia powders were prepared via gas phase synthesis and wet chemical reaction. While pure alumina showed the typical phase transition from γ, δ to α-phase at 1100 to 1200°C, Fe2O3–doping seems to reduce the phase transition temperature significantly. All powders had to be calcined to achieve a crystalline structure. These first results of this comparative investigation indicate that gas-phase deposited powders are more qualified for the preparation of advanced materials.