Chapter 68. Advanced Ceramic or Glass Components and Composites by Electro–Phoretic Deposition/Impregnation Using Nanosized Particles

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Jan Tabellion and
  2. Rolf Clasen

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch68

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Tabellion, J. and Clasen, R. (2002) Advanced Ceramic or Glass Components and Composites by Electro–Phoretic Deposition/Impregnation Using Nanosized Particles, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch68

Author Information

  1. Saarland University Department of Powder Technology Im Stadtwald, Building 43 D–66123 Saarbrucken, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • ceramic components;
  • glass composites;
  • electrophoretic deposition;
  • nanosized particles;
  • glass coatings

Summary

Nano-particles can be used in ceramic processing to fulfill specific functions within a glass or ceramic matrix where the functionality is governed by their size. Furthermore, they can be used for the manufacturing of bulk ceramic or glass components, coatings and composites, taking advantage of their enhanced sinterability, which results in a significantly reduced sintering temperature. By means of electrophoretic deposition ceramic and glass coatings and components can be shaped fast, cost efficient and environmentally acceptable from aqueous suspensions. Homogeneous compacts with complex geometry and uniform wall thickness can be shaped. Since the deposition rate is independent of particle size, homogeneous green bodies with high density (>80 %TD) could be prepared by deposition of powder mixtures with non-monomodal particle size distribution. Thus components of different shapes could be manufactured near-shape due to the reduced shrinkage during sintering (<10% linear shrinkage). By means of electrophoretic impregnation of porous green bodies with nanosized particles, ceramic or glass components with functionally graded density or/and chemical composition could be produced.