Chapter 72. A Novel Hybrid Route to Chemically–Tailored, Three–Dimensional Oxide Nanostructures: The Basic (Bioclastic and Shape–Preserving Inorganic Conversion) Process

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Ken H. Sandhage1,
  2. Matthew B. Dickerson1,
  3. Philip M. Huseman1,
  4. Frank M. Zalar1,
  5. Mark C. Carroll1,
  6. Michelle R. Rondon2 and
  7. Eryn C. Sandhage3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch72

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Sandhage, K. H., Dickerson, M. B., Huseman, P. M., Zalar, F. M., Carroll, M. C., Rondon, M. R. and Sandhage, E. C. (2002) A Novel Hybrid Route to Chemically–Tailored, Three–Dimensional Oxide Nanostructures: The Basic (Bioclastic and Shape–Preserving Inorganic Conversion) Process, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch72

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 481 Watts Hall, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210

  2. 2

    Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, 452 Bioscience Building, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210

  3. 3

    Jones Middle School, Upper Arlington, OH 43221

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • oxide nanostmctures;
  • shape-preserving chemical conversion;
  • biological organisms;
  • miniature devices;
  • crystallization

Summary

A novel, hybrid route to chemically-tailored oxide nanostructures with complex, three-dimensional (3D) shapes is introduced: the Bioclastic and Shape-preserving Inorganic Conversion (BaSIC) process. This process couples the massively-parallel and precise replication of biological organisms with rapid, shape-preserving chemical conversion via fluid/solid reactions, so that large numbers (billions) of identical 3D nanostructures can produced with desired (non-natural) compositions. The BASIC process is demonstrated by converting ornate, SiO2–based diatom frustules (microshells) into MgO nanostructures that retain the frustule shapes and fine features. Such MgO nanostructures are attractive for biomedical and environmental applications (e.g., drug delivery, water purification). By choosing among the numerous shapes and fine features available in bioclastic structures (from diatoms, radiolaria, sponges, silicoflagellates, etc.), and by using other reactive gases, meso/nanostructures with a wide variety of shapes, features, and compositions may be mass produced by the BaSIC process.