Chapter 81. Processing of Bioactive Ceramics with Defined Porosity

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Charles M. Lofton,
  2. Wolfgang Sigmund and
  3. Huiyan Huang

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch81

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Lofton, C. M., Sigmund, W. and Huang, H. (2002) Processing of Bioactive Ceramics with Defined Porosity, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch81

Author Information

  1. University of Florida 225 Rhines Hall Gainesville, Florida 32611–6400

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • bioactive ceramics;
  • porosity;
  • skeletal system damage;
  • synthetic materials;
  • nucleation

Summary

The current medical procedure for the fixation and stabilization of damaged bones requires the insertion and later removal of metallic pens and plates. Such a procedure damages healthy tissue and is time consuming and expensive. While there are materials that chemically bond to tissue and resorb after their usefulness, their use for fixation has been impossible because of their low mechanical strength. A new processing method shows the ability to create bone scaffolds with a mixture of chemical reactivity, functional microstructure, and good mechanical properties. This processing method uses the phase separation between polymers of two compositions to create large pores. This scaffold is a composite of sol-gel produced bioglass and a reinforcing polymer for bioactivity, resorbablity, and strength. The scaffold has a microstructure of interconnected porosity for high surface area and the possibility of integrating bone growth factors or bone cells to accelerate the repair of damaged tissue.