Chapter 90. A Composites Approach to Tissue Engineering

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Aldo R. Boccaccini1,
  2. Judith A. Roelher1,
  3. Larry L. Hench1,
  4. Veronique Maquet2 and
  5. Robert Jérǒme2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch90

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Boccaccini, A. R., Roelher, J. A., Hench, L. L., Maquet, V. and Jérǒme, R. (2002) A Composites Approach to Tissue Engineering, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch90

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Materials and Tissue Engineering Centre, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London SW7 2BP, UK

  2. 2

    Centre for Education and Research on Macromolecules (CERM), Interfacultary Centre for Biomaterials, University of Liège, B–4000 Liège, Belgium

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • tissue engineering;
  • composite materials;
  • biodegradable polymers;
  • bioactive ceramics;
  • hytlroxylapatite

Summary

Composite materials based on biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics, including tricalcium phosphate, hydroxylapatite and bioactive glasses, are being considered increasingly as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, especially for bone and cartilage tissue. The reason for adding bioactive phases to biodegradable polymers forming composite scaffolds is threefold: i) to enhance bioactivity, ii) to provide adequate control of the scaffold degradation rate, and iii) to enhance the mechanical properties and structural integrity of scaffolds. In the first part of this report a summary of recent composite approaches developed for bone tissue regeneration and repair is presented. In the second part a porous composite scaffold being developed and tested currently is described in terms of processing and behaviour in contact with simulated body fluid. The composite is made of a bioresorbable poly(D,L–lactide) foam impregnated and filled with bioactive glass (Bioglass) particles.