Chapter 92. Hardness and Dimensional Stability of a Bioceramic Dental Filling Material Based on Calcium Aluminate Cement

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Lars Kraft and
  2. Leif Hermansson

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch92

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Kraft, L. and Hermansson, L. (2002) Hardness and Dimensional Stability of a Bioceramic Dental Filling Material Based on Calcium Aluminate Cement, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch92

Author Information

  1. Material Science Department Uppsala University Box 534 S–751 21 Uppsala Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • bioceramic dental filling material;
  • calcium aluminate cement;
  • dentistry;
  • metallic moulds;
  • porosity development

Summary

This work presents some physical properties of a prototype dental filling material. The material is based on calcium aluminate cement (CAC) which, when delivered to the dentist, is shaped into small tablets. Specimens were manufactured according to instructions for dentistry. The tablets are dipped in water for approximately 10 seconds to start the hydration process and then they are packed into cylindrical acrylic or metallic moulds, which represent tooth cavities. The specimens are thereafter stored in water at 37°C. The hardness and porosity development with time are presented. The dimensional change of the material is also examined and long-term data is presented. The results show that this material exhibits equal or higher hardness than amalgams and composites. Long-term data (>200 days) of linear dimensional changes show an expansion of 0.2%.