Chapter 94. Bioactive Glass–Ceramics Materials for Bone Substitutes

  1. Hau-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. C. Vitale Brovarone,
  2. F. Smeacetto and
  3. E. Verne

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch94

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4

How to Cite

Brovarone, C. V., Smeacetto, F. and Verne, E. (2002) Bioactive Glass–Ceramics Materials for Bone Substitutes, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 4 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294758.ch94

Author Information

  1. Polytechnic of Turin, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375792

Online ISBN: 9780470294758

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Keywords:

  • bioactive glass-ceramic powders;
  • bone substitutes;
  • cold uniaxial pressing;
  • biomaterials;
  • simulated body fluid

Summary

Bioactive glass-ceramic powders belonging to the following system SiO2–Na2O–CaO–MgO were prepared via sol-gel. These powders were compacted by cold uniaxial pressing and then sintered at low temperatures in order to obtain a porous consolidated system. The biomaterials were then soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF) to study their bioactiviry. Both the as obtained samples and the soaked ones, were characterized by means of X–ray diffraction and optical and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In this paper, we present some preliminary results on these glass-ceramics that we believe might be successfully proposed as scaffold for bone substitutes. Future developments will involve the addition to the glass-ceramic powders of a second organic phases thermally degradable in order to obtain a macroporous structure.