Chapter 20. Study on the Mechanical Characterization and Microscopic Structure of Korean Whiteware and American Whiteware

  1. Willam M. Carty
  1. Hee-Jin Lim1,
  2. S. C. Choi1,
  3. J. Lee1,
  4. Hyung-Sup Lim2 and
  5. Yoshiro Ikeda3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294796.ch20

Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 2

Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 2

How to Cite

Lim, H.-J., Choi, S. C., Lee, J., Lim, H.-S. and Ikeda, Y. (2003) Study on the Mechanical Characterization and Microscopic Structure of Korean Whiteware and American Whiteware, in Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294796.ch20

Author Information

  1. 1

    Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea

  2. 2

    Sukgyung Co. Ltd., Kyounggi Do, Korea

  3. 3

    Kansas State University, Manhatten, KS

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375822

Online ISBN: 9780470294796

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Keywords:

  • whiteware;
  • shrinkage;
  • plasticity;
  • interfacial;
  • sintering

Summary

Studies were conducted to compare and analyze various factors which cause cracks and defects on Korean and American whiteware products. The mechanical properties and crack patterns of whitewares sintered at 1100°, 1200°, and 1300°C were examined. Whiteware bodies sintered at 1300°C had improved mechanical properties due to the sintering density and vitrification. TEM and SEM showed that a new intermediate layer was made on the interface of the layered structure and the shrinkage rate was higher on American whiteware because of coarser particle sizes. The experiment of plasticity also indicated that whiteware production was affected by the distribution of organic matters, which was higher in American whitewares. Studies on the sintered bodies were performed using XRD, EPMA, FEM and UTM in order to examine the formation of the interfacial reaction layer between body and glaze and the formation and effect of residual stress on mechanical strength. The bodies sintered at 1300°C were found to have maximum density and mechanical strength. Furthermore, we determined that the residual stress on the surface of bodies was minimum at the specific thickness of glazes and the mechanical strength was also excellent at the constant sintering temperature.