Chapter 22. Particle Separation by Size: Effects of Solids Loading, Dispersant Level, and Settling Time on Particle Segregation

  1. Willam M. Carty
  1. Michael Brumbach,
  2. Ryan Gerringer,
  3. Karen Mannella and
  4. W. M. Carty

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294796.ch22

Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 2

Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 2

How to Cite

Brumbach, M., Gerringer, R., Mannella, K. and Carty, W. M. (2003) Particle Separation by Size: Effects of Solids Loading, Dispersant Level, and Settling Time on Particle Segregation, in Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294796.ch22

Author Information

  1. Whiteware Research Center, Alfred University, Alfred, NY

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375822

Online ISBN: 9780470294796

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • chemical properties;
  • X-ray difraabn;
  • electron microscopy;
  • microstructures;
  • optimum

Summary

Specific surface area (SSA), measured by the BET method (N2-adsorption), was used to monitor particle segregation in whiteware suspensions as a function of solids loading, dispersant level, and settling time. The SSA of the suspension was found to increase as large particles settled. The change in SSA can be related to a change in composition of the suspended material. A 20% change in SSA related to a settling of∼1/6 of the non-plastics. At low solids concentration (30 vol%) suspensions segregate rapidly at a PAA level of 0.09 mg/m2 independent of settling time — this PAA level is less than half of the dispersant concentration (0.2 mg/m2) necessary to reach the minimum viscosity in the dispersion demand curve. Also, for dispersant levels above 0.9 mg/m2 and long settling times, there is evidence for mineralogical segregation within the clay itself (i.e., proposed to be the segregation of impurity minerals). Higher solids concentration (45 vol%) shows virtually no change in particle segregation under any conditions.