Chapter 24. Utilization of Diatomite as a Desiccant Aid

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. Narueporn Vaneesorn,
  2. Suphakan Khammanee,
  3. Patarawan Kahawong,
  4. Supamas Danwittayakul and
  5. Aree Thanaboonsombut

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch24

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

How to Cite

Vaneesorn, N., Khammanee, S., Kahawong, P., Danwittayakul, S. and Thanaboonsombut, A. (2003) Utilization of Diatomite as a Desiccant Aid, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch24

Author Information

  1. National Metal and Materials Technology Center National Science and Technology Development Agency 114 Paholyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, THAILAND

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375839

Online ISBN: 9780470294802

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Keywords:

  • diatomaceous earth;
  • gas adsorption technique;
  • silica mineral powders;
  • diatomite products;
  • x-ray diffraction

Summary

Diatomaceous earth or the so-called diatomite, when hardened, is a light-color, sedimentary and silica-rich material. Its moisture absorption typically ranges from 2 to 2.5 times that of the dry weight but can be increased to 5.5 times by an addition of fluxes during firing. In order to optimize the absorption capability of the raw material, various heat treatment schedules from 100 to 1100 °C were conducted and the heat-treated samples were examined during a 45-days period. The absorption capability of the samples was found to decrease from 15 to 0.45 wt%. The gas adsorption (BET) technique showed a decrease in a specific surface area from 36.2 to 34.7 m2/g as the temperature increased from 100 to 600°C.