Chapter 46. Impregnation of Nickel Foils with Nanocrystalline Ceria as Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Sofc

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. Sascha Kuehn,
  2. Jan Tabellion and
  3. Rolf Clasen

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch46

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

How to Cite

Kuehn, S., Tabellion, J. and Clasen, R. (2003) Impregnation of Nickel Foils with Nanocrystalline Ceria as Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Sofc, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch46

Author Information

  1. Department of Powder Technology Saarland University, Buildung 43A 66123 Saarbruecken Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375839

Online ISBN: 9780470294802

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Keywords:

  • solid oxide fuel cells;
  • cathode materials;
  • electrolyte;
  • solid oxide fuel cells;
  • cathode coatings

Summary

Solid electrolytes with good oxygen-ion conductivity are of particular interest for application in high-temperature fuel cells. This paper focuses on the manufacturing of the anode, acting as substrate for the multilayer system anode / electrolyte / cathode in a SOFC. Anodes build as porous composites, mixed of nickel and gadolinium doped ceria GDC 10 are bound to percolation theory and tend to over-potential loss when the metal parts corrode. In pure-nickel anodes the conductive metal particles are heavily networked. Partly coating these metal anodes with nanometer-ranged ceramic films provides a necessary ionic conductivity of the anode. In this way over-potential loss is reduced and the electrochemically active area is expanded. This advanced anodic structure is conventionally achieved by electrochemical vapor deposition. An alternative manufacturing route is presented here. The anodes were prepared by pressing of nickel powder with 20 — 45 microns in diameter and then electrophoretically impregnated subsequently with nanometer-sized GDC powders. The nano-particles infiltrate the open pore channels of the nickel specimen and form a layer on the surface of the nickel particles. Green bodies and sintered anodes were analyzed by SEM.