Chapter 52. Relationship Between Defects and Dynamic Failure in Silicon Carbide

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. M. Bakas1,
  2. V. A. Greenhut1,
  3. D. E. Niesz1,
  4. J. Adams2 and
  5. J. Mccauley2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch52

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

How to Cite

Bakas, M., Greenhut, V. A., Niesz, D. E., Adams, J. and Mccauley, J. (2003) Relationship Between Defects and Dynamic Failure in Silicon Carbide, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch52

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ceramic and Materials Engineering, Rutgers University 607 Taylor Road Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065

  2. 2

    U.S. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen, MD 21005

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375839

Online ISBN: 9780470294802

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Keywords:

  • silicon carbide ceramic;
  • carbon sintering aids;
  • whiskers;
  • vapor phase atomic transport;
  • depth of penetration

Summary

Silicon carbide (SiC) is a potential next generation candidate for ceramic or composite armor systems. Silicon carbide has hardness, toughness and modulus characteristics that should provide effective resistance to dynamic failure, but tests on the material show highly variable performance, even within production lots. High quality, hot pressed SiC from various lots and suppliers were subjected to ballistic depth of penetration tests. Fragments were examined employing optical, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A variety of sizable defects were found including: pores, inclusions and secondary phases. SiC grain size and size distribution was quite variable amongst the various samples examined. Polished section samples were also characterized to relate to the fragment structure. The observations suggest that the defects and variability of grain size may account for the differences in ballistic performance.