Chapter 55. Development of Cmc-Materials for Lightweight Armor

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. Bernhard Heidenreich1,
  2. Walter Krenkel1 and
  3. Bernd Lexow2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch55

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

How to Cite

Heidenreich, B., Krenkel, W. and Lexow, B. (2008) Development of Cmc-Materials for Lightweight Armor, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch55

Author Information

  1. 1

    DLR — German Aerospace Center Institute of Structures and Design Pfaffenwaldring 38-40 D-70569 Stuttgart

  2. 2

    Fraunhofer Gesellschaft e.V. EMI — Ernst Mach Institute Am Klingelberg 1 D-79588 Efringen-Kirchen

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375839

Online ISBN: 9780470294802

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Keywords:

  • calcium zirconate;
  • dicalcium silicate;
  • alumina;
  • calcium nitrate tetrahydrate;
  • x-ray diffraction

Summary

Ceramic armor systems offer excellent protection against armor piercing ammunition at significantly lower area density compared to conventional hard armor steel. Their main disadvantages are the high costs of the commonly used monolithic ceramic tiles and the inadequate protection against multiple hits. To improve the multiple hit performance, various ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials have been tested successfully, but due to their even higher costs compared to monolithic tiles, they are not commonly used.

In the work presented, a different approach with novel CMC materials, developed by the DLR via the cost effective LSI process (Liquid silicon infiltration), has been chosen. In a first screening test, the ballistic performance of different carbon fiber (CF) reinforced C/C-Sic and one biomorphic SiSiC against 7.62 × 51 mm AP were studied. The novel SiSiC material was shown to possess good single hit properties, whereas a good fracture behavior was obtained with the carbon fiber reinforced C/C-Sic materials.