Chapter 57. The Physics of Ceramics from Shock-Wave Experiments

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. Dennis E. Grady

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch57

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3

How to Cite

Grady, D. E. (2003) The Physics of Ceramics from Shock-Wave Experiments, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 3 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294802.ch57

Author Information

  1. Applied Research Associates 4300 San Mateo Boulevard Albuquerque, NM 87110, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375839

Online ISBN: 9780470294802

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Keywords:

  • single-edge precracked beam;
  • ballistic tests;
  • liquid phase sintered;
  • U.S. army;
  • yttrium aluminates

Summary

Characterization of the response of materials in the terminal ballistic environment through either analytic or computational models has proven challenging. There is little argument that ceramics have been found difficult to characterize and model. Both equation-of-state and strength properties of ceramics contribute, at comparable levels, to the material's ballistic resistance. Measurement of the requisite equation-of-state and strength properties within the appropriate dynamic environment has place additional demands on proven techniques such as the shock wave test.

The shock wave experiment lies at the heart of the technologies under development to uncover the mechanical behavior of ceramics in the ballistic event, and to provide the needed dynamic material properties. Methods have evolved for measuring the Hugoniot equation of state, transient phase transformation, compressive shear and compaction strength, and tensile fracture strength along with kinetic features of these dynamic processes. Experimental properties for the dynamic deformation processes have been determined for a range of ceramics. Shock wave experimental methods offer a powerhl tool for accessing and measuring the response of ceramics in the terminal ballistic event. Researchers are learning, however, that greatest benefit is achieved when shock wave testing and evaluation is in concert with other measurement technologies including a range of static compression and Hopkinson bar test methods.