Chapter 36. Processing and Structural Advantages of the Sylramic-iBN SiC Fiber for SiC/SiC Components

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. H. M. Yun,
  2. J. A. Dicarlo,
  3. R. T. Bhatt and
  4. J. B. Hurst

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294826.ch36

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4

How to Cite

Yun, H. M., Dicarlo, J. A., Bhatt, R. T. and Hurst, J. B. (2008) Processing and Structural Advantages of the Sylramic-iBN SiC Fiber for SiC/SiC Components, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294826.ch36

Author Information

  1. NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375846

Online ISBN: 9780470294826

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • component architecture;
  • fiber strength;
  • surface chemical attack;
  • microstructures;
  • sylramic fiber

Summary

The successful high-temperature application of complex-shaped SiC/SiC components will depend on achieving as high a fraction of the as-produced fiber strength as possible during component fabrication and service. Key issues center on a variety of component architecture, processing, and service-related factors that can reduce fiber strength, such as fiber-fiber abrasion during architecture shaping, surface chemical attack during interphase deposition and service, and intrinsic flaw growth during high-temperature matrix formation and composite creep. The objective of this paper is to show that the NASA-developed Sylramic-iBN SiC fiber minimizes many of these issues for state-of-the-art melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/BN/SiC composites. To accomplish this, data from various mechanical tests are presented that compare how different high performance SiC fiber types retain strength during formation of complex architectures, during processing of BN interphases and MI matrices, and during simulated composite service at high temperatures.