Chapter 73. Thermo-Mechanical and Fracture Analysis of SiC in Cannon Bore Applications

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. J. H. Underwood,
  2. P. J. Cote and
  3. G. N. Vigilante

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294826.ch73

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4

How to Cite

Underwood, J. H., Cote, P. J. and Vigilante, G. N. (2003) Thermo-Mechanical and Fracture Analysis of SiC in Cannon Bore Applications, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294826.ch73

Author Information

  1. US Army TACOM-ARDEC-Benet Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375846

Online ISBN: 9780470294826

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Keywords:

  • cannon bore heating;
  • thermo-mechanical models;
  • transformation;
  • permanent compressive deformation;
  • tensile residual stresses

Summary

A 200 W/mm2 heat flux typical of cannon bore heating is applied to a SiC sample using pulsed laser heating that simulates cannon firing. Thermomechanical models of the near-bore failure processes in fired chromium-plated steel cannons are adapted to evaluate SiC for potential use in cannon bore applications. Near-bore transient temperatures are calculated using a finite difference method and validated using the observed depth and known temperature of the steel transformation. Cracks both normal and parallel to the heated surface are noted in the SiC sample to a depth of 0.08 mm following 5 ms pulses of laser heating. The cracking is attributed to similar mechanisms as those in cannon, i. e., transient thermal expansion and permanent compressive deformation at high temperature followed by thermal contraction and tensile residual stresses upon cooling. Fracture analysis shows that the 0.08 mm deep cracks would lead to further cracking of the SiC upon application of cannon firing pressures.