Chapter 74. Ceramic “Machinability” - What Does it Mean?

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven and
  2. Hua-Tay Lin
  1. J. B. Quinn1,
  2. R. N. Katz2,
  3. I. K. Lloyd3 and
  4. G. D. Quinn4

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294826.ch74

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4

27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4

How to Cite

Quinn, J. B., Katz, R. N., Lloyd, I. K. and Quinn, G. D. (2003) Ceramic “Machinability” - What Does it Mean?, in 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 4 (eds W. M. Kriven and H.-T. Lin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294826.ch74

Author Information

  1. 1

    American Dental Assoc. Foundation, Paffenbarger Research Center, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8546

  2. 2

    WPI Dept. of Mechanical Eng., 100 Institute Rd., Worcester, MA 01609-2280

  3. 3

    University of Maryland Eng., Materials Program College Park, MD 20742-2115

  4. 4

    Nat'l Inst. Of Standards and Tech., 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375846

Online ISBN: 9780470294826

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Keywords:

  • machinability;
  • high-tech ceramics;
  • general ceramic machinability exist;
  • different ceramic materials;
  • ceramic machine shops

Summary

The relative “machinability” of high-tech ceramics is often mentioned in the literature, implying a generalized meaning of this term beyond context-specific applications. Many different indicators of general ceramic machinability exist, such as material removal rates or properties such as hardness. This study compares the general machinability of nine different ceramic materials, utilizing some of these suggested measurement approaches. Among the assessment techniques are grindability, susceptibility to edge chipping, various material properties and combined functions. The nine ceramics are also subjectively evaluated by experienced machinists from six specialty ceramic machine shops, utilizing a subjective scale suggested by one of the machinists. The relative importance of various factors influencing general ceramic machinability is discussed in light of the findings.