12. How Mathematical Modeling Can Help Reduce Energy Usage for Glass Melting

  1. Waltraud M. Kriven
  1. Erik Muijsenberg1 and
  2. Miroslav Trochta2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294857.ch12

64th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 1

64th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 1

How to Cite

Muijsenberg, E. and Trochta, M. (2004) How Mathematical Modeling Can Help Reduce Energy Usage for Glass Melting, in 64th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 1 (ed W. M. Kriven), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294857.ch12

Author Information

  1. 1

    Glass Service BV, Maastricht, the Netherlands

  2. 2

    Glass Service Inc. Vsetín, Czech Republic

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375860

Online ISBN: 9780470294857

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • state of the art techniques;
  • glass melting furnaces;
  • modeling combustion chambers;
  • cornbustion model;
  • mirrored image

Summary

The state-of-the-art techniques of modeling of glass-melting furnaces give a time averaged solution of the whole (coupled) model. This method seems to be satisfactory to obtain accurate heat fluxes between the glass and combustion space, and thus to have a good boundary condition for the glass model to evaluate all the values of interest, such as glass flow patterns, temperatures, batch shape, quality indices, seed counts, and so on. However, in modeling combustion chambers of regenerative furnaces, we can see processes that, because of their nature, are time-dependent and cannot be represented by a time-averaged steady state. We can, for example, approximate the time-averaged heat fluxes between the combustion chamber and the glass melt even in regenerative furnaces, because we can use symmetry, or, in the worst case, two combustion models that represent firing from each side. However, if we want to simulate the regenerators themselves, we cannot find any time-averaged state. For such purposes, we employ a simplified transient combustion model. Results of simulations of two designs of a regenerator are presented and discussed. Some drawbacks of traditional regenerator designs are identified and improvements suggested.