Chapter 11. Results of Scaled Testing and Analytical Investigations of a Cullet Preheater

  1. William Smothers
  1. R. De Saro1,
  2. G. Ridderbusch1,
  3. J. Pagliarlni1,
  4. L. Donaldson2 and
  5. S. Panahe3

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310472.ch11

48th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 3/4

48th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

De Saro, R., Ridderbusch, G., Pagliarlni, J., Donaldson, L. and Panahe, S. (2008) Results of Scaled Testing and Analytical Investigations of a Cullet Preheater, in 48th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 3/4 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310472.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    Tecogen, Inc. 45 First Ave., Waltham, MA 02254

  2. 2

    Gas Research Inst. 8600 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Chicago, IL 60631

  3. 3

    Southern California Gas Co. El Monte, CA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374788

Online ISBN: 9780470310472

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Keywords:

  • production;
  • combustion;
  • thermal;
  • modifications;
  • effectiveness

Summary

Tecogen, Inc. is developing a gas fired cullet preheater (patents are currently being filed). The benefits of such a device to a glass manufacturer are increased production, avoidance of the high operating cost of electric boost, and a short payback period. The most important of these advantages is increased furnace production. The maximum amount of glass that can be pulled from an existing furnace is limited by the amount of energy that can be put into the furnace to melt the feedstock. This limit is reached when the burners are at high fire resulting in maximum combustion gas flow. The cullet preheater overcomes this limit by putting additional energy into the furnace via preheated cullet. As an example, preheating the cullet of a 180 tonne/d (200 t/d) container furnacer (using 50% cullet) could potentially increase that furnace's production to 234 tonne/d (260 t/d). The payback of the cullet preheater is less than one yr since a production increase can be sustained with few if any additional employees. Since labor costs are the largest cost to produce glass, this results in substantial reduction in product cost as labor costs are spread over a larger production run. This paper reports on the scaled experimental work, systems study, theoretical analysis, and full scale construction of the cullet preheater.