Chapter 7. Glass Melting with Pure Oxygen Combustion: Modeling of Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer

  1. William Smothers
  1. Dominique Jouvaud,
  2. Jean-François I'Huissier and
  3. Bernard Genies

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310472.ch7

48th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 3/4

48th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Jouvaud, D., I'Huissier, J.-F. and Genies, B. (1988) Glass Melting with Pure Oxygen Combustion: Modeling of Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer, in 48th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 3/4 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310472.ch7

Author Information

  1. Air Liquide, CRCD Research Center 78350 Jouy en Josas, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374788

Online ISBN: 9780470310472

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Keywords:

  • combustion;
  • nitrogen;
  • radiative;
  • energy;
  • frequency

Summary

Models of convective and radiation heat transfer have been developed to support and supplement ongoing application of oxygen used for improved glass melting efficiencies. These models add to our experience and give security to our customers that their glass quality, pull rates, and furnaces will be maintained. The suppression of ballast nitrogen from the combustion process changes the flame temperature, the composition, and volume of combustion products. Radiation heat transfer is sensitive to the temperature and composition (partial pressures) of the combustion products. Data were entered into 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional furnace models to determine maps of circulation patterns, temperature profiles, and as a consequence, heat transfer rates. Databases giving thermodynamic properties of gases relating temperature dependence of composition and emissivity were dynamically and iteratively entered into the computer programs developed. Examples are given of the method of estimating temperature gradients in the gas above a batch of glass. Comparisons between heat flux with cool air, preheated air, and pure oxygen combustion are given. Calculations corroborated our practical experiences showing that melting efficiency improves with pure oxygen combustion at the same time that crown temperatures can be held constant and stack temperatures drop.