Chapter 27. Porcelain Enamel's Use in Power Generator Plants

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Thomas Kraaijveld1 and
  2. Louis J. Gazo2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310489.ch27

Proceedings of the 49th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 5/6

Proceedings of the 49th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 5/6

How to Cite

Kraaijveld, T. and Gazo, L. J. (1988) Porcelain Enamel's Use in Power Generator Plants, in Proceedings of the 49th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 5/6 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310489.ch27

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ferro Holland Rotterdam, Holland

  2. 2

    Ferro Corp. 4150 E. 56th St. Cleveland, OH 44101

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374795

Online ISBN: 9780470310489

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Keywords:

  • sulfur dioxide;
  • corrosive;
  • uranium;
  • atmospheric water;
  • desulfurization

Summary

The cheapest energy source for an electrical power plant is coal, but where fossil fuels are burned, flue gases contain sulfur dioxide which must be removed with gas desulfurization installations. The results of this desulfurization process are dilute sulfuric acid and an extremely corrosive atmosphere for the materials in the installation. Such an installation is ideal for the application of porcelain enamel. Considering the tenuous future of nuclear energy in the United States and in Europe, porcelain enamel factories worldwide would be wise to establish for themselves general standards and test methods for such an application to competently meet future demands.