Chapter 13. Strength of Sapphire in Tension as Measured by Flat Plate Pressure Loading to Burst Tests

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Craig E. Jenson and
  2. Carl Mounteer

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch13

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Jenson, C. E. and Mounteer, C. (1988) Strength of Sapphire in Tension as Measured by Flat Plate Pressure Loading to Burst Tests, in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch13

Author Information

  1. Gulton, Servonic Division A MARK IV COMPANY Costa Mesa, CA 92627

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374801

Online ISBN: 9780470310496

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Keywords:

  • oxidation;
  • infiltration;
  • parameters;
  • flexural strengths;
  • debond

Summary

The design of pressure transducers has required using low hysteresis, high strength materials. Single crystal sapphire was selected based on strength data for filaments and whiskers. Development of fabrication processes providing sapphire parts with strengths approaching filament data has been the focus of activity for developing new transducer technology. Various sapphire material conditions were tested to determine tensile strengths. Crystal orientation, surface finish, and thermal history were independent variables. The objective of the experiments was to determine the design limits for a pressurized flat plate; boundary conditions for the plate were considered. Damaged surfaces produced the lowest strength flat plates, but annealing was determined to restore significant tensile strength. Tensile strengths greater than 124 GPa (180 000 psi) were observed.