Chapter 16. Interfacial Characterization of Glass Matrid Nicalon Sic Fiber Composites: A Thermodynamic Approach

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. M. Benson,
  2. K. E. Spear and
  3. C. G. Pantano

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch16

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Benson, P. M., Spear, K. E. and Pantano, C. G. (2008) Interfacial Characterization of Glass Matrid Nicalon Sic Fiber Composites: A Thermodynamic Approach, in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch16

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, 16802

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374801

Online ISBN: 9780470310496

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Keywords:

  • infiltration;
  • cylindrical capillaries;
  • ceramic;
  • feasibility;
  • hafnium diboride

Summary

Experimental studies by a number of researchers have shown that a carbon-rich interface is formed between Nicalon' Sic fibers and several different glass and glass-ceramic mahix materials. This carbon layer is believed to play an important role in the outstanding mechanical properties of these composites. A basic understanding of the chemical interactions between the matrix and fibers is necessary to model interface evolution and stability and to predict other possible composite systems. Herein, calculations of thermodynamic equilibria between silica and doped silicate glass matrices and SiC fiber systems provide a fundamental description of this carbon layer formation. Transport mechanisms for the interface constituents contribute to the modeling of the growth of the carbon interphase.