Chapter 19. Role of Glassy Interfaces in High Temperature Crack Growth in Sic Fiber Reinforced Alumina

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S. V. Nair1,
  2. K. Jakus1 and
  3. C. Ostertag2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch19

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Nair, S. V., Jakus, K. and Ostertag, C. (1988) Role of Glassy Interfaces in High Temperature Crack Growth in Sic Fiber Reinforced Alumina, in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch19

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003

  2. 2

    National Bureau of Standards Gaithersburg, MD

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374801

Online ISBN: 9780470310496

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Keywords:

  • polymethyl;
  • conventional;
  • diameter;
  • concentration;
  • plasticizer

Summary

Glassy alumina reinforced with continuous Sic fibers and pure alumina reinforced with Sic fiber, with and without a coating of a borosilicate glass, were studied in this investigation. Constant displacement rate and constant load tests were conducted at approximately 1000°C. These tests were interrupted at various times to examine crack morphology changes with temperature and time dependent effects on fiber bridging of cracks. Cracks were found to open in a time dependent fashion by fiber pullout prior to eventual failure. This behavior was modeled by a time dependent interfacial slip caused by a glassy layer at the fiber/matrix interface.