Chapter 33. Gel-Derived Lithium Aluminosilicate Particulate Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. J. C. Walck

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch33

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Walck, J. C. (1988) Gel-Derived Lithium Aluminosilicate Particulate Composites, in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch33

Author Information

  1. U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory Watertown, MA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374801

Online ISBN: 9780470310496

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • sintering;
  • resistance;
  • monolithic;
  • nonconducting;
  • widespread

Summary

Glass-ceramic composites were successfully fabricated by dispersing amorphous lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) particulates in a gelling silica glass matrix. Composites containing 50 vol% LAS were easily cast, dried, and fired without segregation or cracking. Elevated temperature processing resulted in both crystallization of the LAS into a beta-Spodumene solid solution phase and densification of the silica gel matrix. Processing, microstructure, phase development, and basic properties are discussed.