Chapter 37. Interfacial Shear Stresses in Sic and Al2O3 Fiber-Reinforced Glasses

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. R. W. Goettler and
  2. K. T. Faber

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch37

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Goettler, R. W. and Faber, K. T. (1988) Interfacial Shear Stresses in Sic and Al2O3 Fiber-Reinforced Glasses, in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch37

Author Information

  1. Department of Ceramic Engineering The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio 43210

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, The Technological Institute, Evanston, IL 60208

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374801

Online ISBN: 9780470310496

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Keywords:

  • mechanism;
  • catastrophic;
  • zirconium titanate;
  • hydrolyze;
  • deflection

Summary

Single fiber pullout tests were performed on silicon carbide and sapphire filaments embedded in glass matrices to determine the interfacial shear strengths both as a function of residual stress and as a function of fiber coating. The effect of residual stress on the interfacial shear stress was studied by altering the glass matrix composition, and hence, the thermal mismatch between fiber and matrix. The interfacial shear strength exhibits a maximum with increasing thermal mismatch after which it drops precipitously and levels off. The presence of a carbon coating on sapphire is sufficient to reduce the interfacial shear stress to measurable levels, while excess carbon at the SiC/glass interface increases the interfacial shear stress. In the silicon carbide-reinforced systems, the interfacial shear strengths are also shown to be stressinprate dependent.