Chapter 45. Silicon Carbide Fibers from Methylpolysilane (MPS) Polymers

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Jonathan Lipowitz,
  2. Gary E. Legrow,
  3. Thomas F. Lim and
  4. Neal Langley

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch45

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Lipowitz, J., Legrow, G. E., Lim, T. F. and Langley, N. (1988) Silicon Carbide Fibers from Methylpolysilane (MPS) Polymers, in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 9, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310496.ch45

Author Information

  1. Dow Corning Corporation Midland, MI 48640

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374801

Online ISBN: 9780470310496

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Keywords:

  • elastic properties;
  • orientations;
  • customized;
  • chemical vapor infiltration (CVI);
  • mechanical properties

Summary

A broad range of silicon carbide compositions centered on the stoichiometric version can be produced from methylpolysilane (MPS) polymers. This family of polymers is prepared by redistribution of methychlorodisilanes. Quarter-nary phosphonium salt catalysis leads to a methylchloropolysilane intermediate which is derivatized with organomagnesium (Grignard) reagents. This derivatization replaces the residual Si-Cl ligands with aliphatic or aromatic organic substituents, producing the family of polyorganosilane polymers. These polymers can be melt spun, cured in the solid state, and pyrolyzed to produce ceramic fibers. Chemical and physical properties of the various silicon carbide fiber compositions produced are described. Methods used to characterize these ceramic fibers include chemical (elemental) analysis, density determination, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, 29Si and 13C magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, scanning Auger depth profiling porosity measurements by X-ray scattering, and thermal stability measurements to 1600°C.