Chapter 15. Boroflux (Zinc Borate) Lower Cost Flux Systems: Reduce the Firing of Most Bodies to Cone 01

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. William M. Jackson II

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310526.ch15

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 1/2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Jackson, W. M. (1989) Boroflux (Zinc Borate) Lower Cost Flux Systems: Reduce the Firing of Most Bodies to Cone 01, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310526.ch15

Author Information

  1. Climax Performance Materials/Amex Inc. Greenwich, CT 06836

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374832

Online ISBN: 9780470310526

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • zinc borate;
  • vitreous porcelains;
  • sanitaryware;
  • boroflux;
  • dinnerware

Summary

Small amounts (2 1/2%) of Boroflux (Zinc Borate) have been used since 1982 to lower the firing temperature of porcelains about 150°F. A new eutectic study has been made of Boroflux #1=30%, Talc#300=20–35% and Minex #7=35–50%. This resulted in a series of glazes which melted below cone 06. When 10% of these fluxes are added to a porcelain, the firing temperature can be reduced about 250°F, which is from cone 9 to cone 01. If 10–20% of these fluxes are added to a talc slip the strength is increased 3 to 5 times. Presently available glazes as well as the above matte glazes can be used to fire to cone 05 and 06, but not higher. Bisque at C-08.