Chapter 2. Observations on Innovations from Abroad

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Cullen L. Hackler

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310540.ch2

Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6

Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6

How to Cite

Hackler, C. L. (1989) Observations on Innovations from Abroad, in Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310540.ch2

Author Information

  1. Mobay Corp., 5601 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, MD 21224

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374856

Online ISBN: 9780470310540

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • porcelain enamel innovations;
  • iron curtain;
  • elimindng pickling;
  • electrophoresis;
  • enameling electronic circulatory

Summary

Porcelain enamel innovations are being made in both the United States and in Europe; both sides of the Atlantic can learn from the other. Europe is expected to have 50% of its porcelain plants using powder by 1990, compared with 37% in North America. Powder is being used by 53 plants in “free” Europe and by 10 behind the Iron Curtain; North America has 13. However, U. S. porcelain plants tend to be bigger than those in Europe. Porcelain innovations in Europe include simplifying pretreatment for two-coat, one-fire powder, eliminating pickling, using electrophoresis, enameling heat exchangers to resist sulfuric acid in power plant applications, enameling electronic circuitry, and using porcelain panels for home heating applications and in such small applications as serving trays.