Chapter 26. Zero Discharge, Zero Pollution, and Source Reduction

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Robert H. Elliott Jr.

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310540.ch26

Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6

Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6

How to Cite

Elliott, R. H. (1989) Zero Discharge, Zero Pollution, and Source Reduction, in Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310540.ch26

Author Information

  1. Zerpol Corp.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374856

Online ISBN: 9780470310540

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Keywords:

  • zero discharge;
  • zero pollution;
  • source reduction;
  • materials in-plant;
  • chemical destruction

Summary

Large savings are possible in processing industrial wastes sensibly. The savings can include the elimination of fines from regulatory agencies, the reuse of materials in-plant, and the sale of recovered materials back to suppliers. A zerodischarge system can make good sense for a plant and help bring about such savings. The process can include chemical destruction, pH adjustment, and heavy metals recovery. A vital part of the process is the intelligent use and recycling of in-plant water. Zero discharge is cementing over the drain; zero pollution is collecting the three separations-metals, organics, and salts-and making certain that they are either destroyed safely or made nonhazardous permanently.