Chapter 3. Use of Robots in a Range Plant

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Jerry Gelbaugh

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310540.ch3

Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6

Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6

How to Cite

Gelbaugh, J. (1989) Use of Robots in a Range Plant, in Proceedings of the 50th Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 5/6 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310540.ch3

Author Information

  1. Caloric Corp., Topton, PA 19562

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374856

Online ISBN: 9780470310540

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Keywords:

  • robots;
  • range plant;
  • robotic system;
  • ground coat acceptance;
  • electrostatic wrap efficiency

Summary

Implementing a robotic system and process controls has reduced scrap by $1 million in one year. The acceptance rate on the cover coat line went from 50% to 90%. Ground coat acceptance is now at 94–96%. Some 6000 individual parts are supplied daily to six assembly lines at a less than 2% reject rate. The plant has a firm commitment to do jobs right the first time. The porcelain department used to run seven days a week to supply assembly with five days of material. Now the assembly line can run Saturday, and the porcelain plant doesn't. To ensure efficient robotic spraying, the conveyor was updated for exact product spacing. Part swaying was eliminated by installing a guide rail, which boosted electrostatic wrap efficiency, allowing line speed to be raised from 11 to 16 fpm.