Chapter 41. Measurement of Interfacial Strengths of Ceramic Composites Via an Indentation Push-Out Test

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. David C. Cranmer

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch41

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Cranmer, D. C. (1989) Measurement of Interfacial Strengths of Ceramic Composites Via an Indentation Push-Out Test, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch41

Author Information

  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374863

Online ISBN: 9780470310557

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Keywords:

  • chemical vapor deposition;
  • fiber-reinforced ceramic composites;
  • chemical vapor infiltration;
  • high fracture toughness;
  • carbon-carbon composites

Summary

An instrumented indenter technique has been used to measure fiber/matrix bonding in several ceramic composites, including SiC/LAS-III, SiC/Borosilicate Glass, Sic/Soda-Lime-Silica Glass, and CVI SiC/SiC. The indenter measures load on the fiber and displacement of the Vicker's diamond directly, thus avoiding the necessity of measuring small indent sizes. Three regimes of force-displacement behavior have been observed with this test method: 1) an initial region where the diamond is in contact with the fiber only, and the sliding length is less than the thickness of the sample, 2) a plateau region where the sliding length is equal to the thickness of the sample, and 3) a final region where the diamond makes contact with and deforms the matrix. The differences in π are discussed in terms of differences in fiber-matrix interface chemistry and residual stresses.