Chapter 48. Interfacial Properties of C-Coated Alumina Fiber/Glass Matrix Fiber Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Cheryl A. Doughan,
  2. Richard L. Lehman and
  3. Victor A. Greenhut

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch48

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Doughan, C. A., Lehman, R. L. and Greenhut, V. A. (2008) Interfacial Properties of C-Coated Alumina Fiber/Glass Matrix Fiber Composites, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch48

Author Information

  1. Center for Ceramics Research Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374863

Online ISBN: 9780470310557

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Keywords:

  • chemical vapor infiltration;
  • thermal expansion;
  • load transfer;
  • fiber coating;
  • debonding stresses

Summary

C-coated alumina fiber/borosilicate glass matrix composites were fabricated by slurry infiltration and hot pressing. Composite flexural strengths were 118 MPa and 263 MPa for uncoated and coated fiber composites, respectively. The interfacial shear strength between the fiber and the matrix was measured by the indentation technique on in-situ fibers. Uncoated fiber composites were chemically bonded and mechanically weak and brittle. C-coated fiber composites showed tough fracture behavior, moderate strengths, and interfacial shear strength values of 107 MPa and 43 MPa for 20% and 45% fiber fraction composites, respectively. Fiber fracture surfaces showed no pulloutfor uncoated fibers, modest (30-60 μ) pullout for 20% fiber composites, and high pullout (>200 μ) for 45% fiber composites. Work of fracture measurements on coated and uncoated fiber composites showed that the work of fracture of uncoated fiber composites is the same as the unreinforced matrix. Coated fiber composites had much higher work of fracture and the values were dependent on fiber fraction. The interfacial shear strength, the fracture surface pullout lengths, and the work of fracture data were related to theory and were mutually consistent.