Chapter 6. Growth and Microstructure of Some Dense Ceramics Formed by Controlled Melt Oxidation

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. D. G. Brandon,
  2. L. Baum,
  3. A. Barak and
  4. A. Venkert

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch6

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Brandon, D. G., Baum, L., Barak, A. and Venkert, A. (1989) Growth and Microstructure of Some Dense Ceramics Formed by Controlled Melt Oxidation, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch6

Author Information

  1. Dept. of Materials Engineering Technicon Israel Institute of Technology Haifa 32000, Israel

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374863

Online ISBN: 9780470310557

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Keywords:

  • chemical vapor deposition;
  • fiber-reinforced ceramic composites;
  • chemical vapor infiltration;
  • high fracture toughness;
  • carbon-carbon composites

Summary

Controlled melt oxidation (“the Lanxide process”) is an attractive route to the inexpensive near-net-shape production of dense ceramic bodies.

Controlled growth occurs via a surface oxide layer formed from a volatile component of the alloy melt. Oxygen is transported through this layer to the growing interface of the bulk oxide, while metal is supplied by capillary flow of molten alloy through this oxide. The metal supply depends on the viscosity, contact angle, and capillary pore dimensions. The transport properties of the surface oxide layer control the oxygen supply.

Ceramics grown from several aluminum alloys have been studied by X-ray diffraction, quantitative optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results will be reported.