Chapter 7. High Temperature Mechanical Properties of a Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Composite Made by Melt Infiltration

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Milivoj K. Brun,
  2. William B. Hillig and
  3. Henry C. Mcguigan

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch7

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Brun, M. K., Hillig, W. B. and Mcguigan, H. C. (1989) High Temperature Mechanical Properties of a Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Composite Made by Melt Infiltration, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310557.ch7

Author Information

  1. General Electric Corporate Research and Development Box 8 Schenectady, NY 12301

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374863

Online ISBN: 9780470310557

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Keywords:

  • chemical vapor infiltration;
  • fiber-reinforced ceramic composites;
  • electron microscopic examination;
  • fiber failure;
  • whiskers

Summary

The melt infiltration technique1 has previously been shown to be a viable process for making ceramic matrix composites, such as when a green body constituted from a mixture of SiC particulates and whiskers is impregnated with molten strontium feldspar. This material system has now been used to provide the matrix in combination with CVD SiC filaments. The strength and work of fracture (WOF) of specimens containing up to 19 vol% of the latter filaments were determined by flexural testing at temperatures up to 1450°C. Preliminary determinations were made of the force required for debonding the fiber from the matrix. The results were found to be influenced by the strength of the fiber after processing and the microstructure of the matrix.