Chapter 11. Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Titanium Diboride Matrix Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. T. M. Besmann and
  2. R. A. Lowden

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch11

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Besmann, T. M. and Lowden, R. A. (1989) Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Titanium Diboride Matrix Composites, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch11

Author Information

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374870

Online ISBN: 9780470310588

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Keywords:

  • silicon carbide matrix composites;
  • ceramics;
  • titanium diboride;
  • carbide;
  • sic-containing boron

Summary

Titanium diboride composites have been fabricated using the forced-flow thermalgradient chemical vapor infiltration technique developed at ORNL. This system has the potential for very high temperature use due to titanium diboride's exceptionally high melting temperature, 3498 K, which should yield high creep resistance. The diboride also has a high thermal and electrical conductivity at all temperatures, well in excess of those of the constituent elements. Preforms prepared from high-strength, high-temperature carbon fabric layups and filament wound tubes have been infiltrated to <15% residual porosity. Intermediate coatings protected the fibers during processing and appropriately weakened the fiber-matrix bond to obtain toughening. Although the composite exhibits moderate strength, microcracking of the matrix due to fiber/matrix expansion mismatch may make structural use of the composite questionable.