Chapter 39. Thermal Fatigue of Ceramic Fiber/Glass Matrix Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Larry P. Zawada1 and
  2. Robert C. Wetherhold2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch39

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Zawada, L. P. and Wetherhold, R. C. (1989) Thermal Fatigue of Ceramic Fiber/Glass Matrix Composites, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch39

Author Information

  1. 1

    AFWAL/MLLN WPAFB, OH

  2. 2

    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering State University of New York Buffalo, NY

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374870

Online ISBN: 9780470310588

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Keywords:

  • microcrack toughening theory;
  • crack defiction;
  • X-ray diffraction;
  • composites of sic- tib;
  • residual stress measurements

Summary

The thermal fatigue (TF) of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) introduces stresses within the composite due to the inevitable thermal expansion mismatch of fiber and matrix; this will affect the lifetime and dimensional stability of the composite. A Nicalon/glass composite has been subjected to rapid, controlled TF from 250°–700°C and 250°–800°C under no load and dead load conditions in order to illustrate a variety of elastic and inelastic cyclic strain conditions. After TF, the surfaces of the composites were characterized using SEM for evidence of thermal damage and microcracking. The composites were then tested for flexural modulus and strength. Results from the mechanical properties tests are present and correlated with observed thermal degradation.