Chapter 51. Sealing of Al-Containing Stainless Steel to Lithia-Alumina-Silica Glass-Ceramic

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. R. T. Cassidy and
  2. W. E. Moddeman

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch51

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Cassidy, R. T. and Moddeman, W. E. (1989) Sealing of Al-Containing Stainless Steel to Lithia-Alumina-Silica Glass-Ceramic, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch51

Author Information

  1. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Miamisburg, OH

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374870

Online ISBN: 9780470310588

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Keywords:

  • thermal expansion;
  • fibers;
  • room temperature;
  • rotary vacuum pump;
  • polynomial constants

Summary

Recent work carried out on a new glass-ceramic/alloy material set for the application of pyrotechnic components is discussed. A newly developed family of austenitic stainless steels has been hermetically sealed to a widely used lithiaalumina-silica (LAS) glass-ceramic. These alloys, originally developed for applications where high oxidation resistance is required, contain 4-5 wt % aluminum. The presence of aluminum offers several advantages from a glass or glass-ceramic sealing point of view. These include the presence of a tenacious, stable oxide (Al2O3 on the alloys' surface as well as the fact that they can be strengthened during sealing via precipitation of a secondary phase, NiAl. In addition, these new alloys offer lower material and machining costs, and improved weldability when compared to the widely used Ni-based superalloys.