Chapter 54. Intelligent Control of Advanced Ceramics Processing

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. D. L. Mohr,
  2. T. L. Starr and
  3. J. N. Harris

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch54

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Mohr, D. L., Starr, T. L. and Harris, J. N. (1989) Intelligent Control of Advanced Ceramics Processing, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch54

Author Information

  1. Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374870

Online ISBN: 9780470310588

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Keywords:

  • ceramics;
  • ion beam;
  • copper depositions;
  • electron beam;
  • ion vapor deposwn

Summary

The development of advanced ceramics requires sophisticated control of processing variables. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride can be formed using ultra-fine silicon powder. This system exhibits rapid, low temperature, near net shape processing. However, rapid reaction rates encountered when nitriding these fine powders requires the introduction of more sophisticated process control than that offered by traditional processing techniques. A computer controlled nitriding system has been implemented that allows intelligent real-time control of the nitriding process. Control is based on an analytical process model which predicts a gas uptake curve for optimal processing. The molar volume of gas introduced as the reaction proceeds is monitored and controlled, as are the temperature and pressure. The control system uses this information to modify the heating rate and the concentration of nitrogen in the system, which controls the reaction kinetics on a real-time basis.