Chapter 63. The Production and Compressive Characteristics of a Low Density Syntactic Metal/Ceramic Foam

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S. A. Rickles,
  2. J. K. Cochran and
  3. T. H. Sanders Jr.

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch63

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Rickles, S. A., Cochran, J. K. and Sanders, T. H. (1989) The Production and Compressive Characteristics of a Low Density Syntactic Metal/Ceramic Foam, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 13th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470310588.ch63

Author Information

  1. School of Materials Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332-0245

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374870

Online ISBN: 9780470310588

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Keywords:

  • fabrication;
  • aluminum;
  • alumina powder;
  • spheres fabricated;
  • metal/aerosphere

Summary

A liquid metal infiltration process which permits the fabrication of a low density, syntactic metal/ceramic foam has been developed and is described in this paper. The foam consists of an aluminum alloy matrix containing uniform, hollow, thinshell spheres fabricated from an alumina powder. These hollow spheres, termed aerospheres, are randomly distributed in a metal matrix of aluminum alloy 7075 resulting in a low density metal/aerosphere composite (MAC) which is inexpensive to fabricate and has potential application when weight savings is of paramount importance. The density of such an Al/Al2O3foam composite ranges from 1.3-1.8 g/cc and is controlled by the physical properties of the aerosphere and/or the volume fraction of spheres in the composite. The emphasis of this paper will be the description of the microstructure, the compressive stress-strain behavior, and the associated failure mechanisms of this low density MAC.