Chapter 15. Interface Mixing Between Metals and Ceramics: Classification, Thermochemistry, and Processing

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S. N. S. Reddy1,
  2. H. S. Betrabet2,
  3. S. P. Purushothaman2 and
  4. C. Narayan2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470312568.ch15

Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12

Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Reddy, S. N. S., Betrabet, H. S., Purushothaman, S. P. and Narayan, C. (1989) Interface Mixing Between Metals and Ceramics: Classification, Thermochemistry, and Processing, in Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470312568.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    IBM - General Technology Division Hopewell Junction, NY 12533

  2. 2

    IBM T. J. Watson Research Center P.O. Box 218 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374887

Online ISBN: 9780470312568

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Keywords:

  • interfaces;
  • chemical interactions;
  • adhesion;
  • equilibrium;
  • AEM

Summary

The bonding interfaces between metals and ceramics can be classified into four groups based upon the nature of chemical interactions that lead to interface mixing. Model systems which illustrate the adhesion mechanism in each class were investigated. The equilibrium thermochemistry required for processing such interfaces is discussed for each example. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the interface regions were carried out by cross-sectional AEM (Analytical Electron Microscopy) and HREM (High Resolution Electron Microscopy), and the results were found to confirm the thermodynamically predicted chemical interactions.