Chapter 2. TEM Studies of Pd/Al2O3 Interfaces

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. J. A. Eastman and
  2. M. Rühle

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470312568.ch2

Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12

Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Eastman, J. A. and Rühle, M. (1989) TEM Studies of Pd/Al2O3 Interfaces, in Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470312568.ch2

Author Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaften Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374887

Online ISBN: 9780470312568

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Keywords:

  • intetfues;
  • oxidation;
  • transmission;
  • thermodynamically;
  • metastable

Summary

Natural Pd/Al2O3 interfaces were produced by internal oxidation of Pd-Al alloys and were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The phase of the Al2O3 precipitates depended on the oxidation temperature and the location of the precipitate inside the Pd matrix. Thermodynamically stable α-Al2O3 precipitates formed only at Pd grain boundaries and did not have a preferred orientation relationship with the Pd. Metastable Al3O3 phases precipitated inside Pd grains and were found to be oriented such that closest-packed planes in both Pd and Al2O3 were in exact register. The precipitate surfaces faceted so that the Pd/Al2O3 interfaces were parallel to polar Al2O3 planes. Periodically spaced dislocations were observed in Al2O3/Pd interfaces produced by oxidation at 1500°C but none were observed when the interfaces were produced at 1000°C or 1150°C.