Chapter 30. Effect of Testing Atmosphere on Mechanical Properties of Ceramic/Metal Joints

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. K. Suganuma,
  2. M. Morita,
  3. T. Okamoto and
  4. M. Koizumi

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470312568.ch30

Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12

Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Suganuma, K., Morita, M., Okamoto, T. and Koizumi, M. (1989) Effect of Testing Atmosphere on Mechanical Properties of Ceramic/Metal Joints, in Proceedings of the International Forum on Structural Ceramics Joining: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 10, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470312568.ch30

Author Information

  1. The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research Osaka University Mihogaoka 8–1, Ibaraki Osaka 567, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374887

Online ISBN: 9780470312568

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • ceramic/metal interfaces;
  • atmosphere;
  • stress corrosion;
  • mechanical;
  • evaluation

Summary

Effects of testing atmosphere on the strength of joints with ceramic/metal interfaces were examined. The difference in strength in two different atmospheres, in dried argon flow and in water, was remarkable. Although the silicon nitride joint with an aluminum braze fractured in the silicon nitride side away from the interface in inert atmosphere, the fracture path was completely along the interface in water. The bond face of silicon nitride ground before bonding was severely attacked by water during testing. This indicates that strong stress corrosion by the presence of water might appear in ceramic/metal interfacial area. The strengths of other ceramic/metal joints including alumina/niobium and silicon nitride/nickel were also degraded by stress corrosion.