Chapter 4. Ceramic Welding at Latchford Glass Company

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Thad R. Busby

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470312841.ch4

Proceedings of the 50th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 1,2

Proceedings of the 50th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 1,2

How to Cite

Busby, T. R. (1990) Ceramic Welding at Latchford Glass Company, in Proceedings of the 50th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 1,2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470312841.ch4

Author Information

  1. Fosbel, Inc. Cleveland, OH 44142

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374894

Online ISBN: 9780470312841

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Keywords:

  • tuckstone area;
  • exothermic;
  • penetration;
  • stability;
  • crystalline

Summary

Ceramic welding is a state-of-the-art process for making durable repairs to refractories in glass furnaces at operational temperatures and with minimal interruption to production. Originally developed by the Belgian glass manufacturer, Glaverbel, the technology now finds worldwide application. Ceramic welding is being used extensively in Europe and the U.S.A. for repairs in glass furnaces. A short description of the process is presented together with discussion in more detail of its application at the Latchford Glass Company plant in Los Angeles. At Latchford an area below the glass line at the backwall, as well as along both sidewalk, was welded. The tuckstones on the backwall inside the furnace were also welded. The center of the furnace at the backwall had eroded to such a degree that there was a hot spot. It was necessary to weld both the tuckstone area and below the glass line at the backwall, as well as along both sidewalls that had been overcoated in early 1987.