Chapter 7. Toxic and Acid Gas Reduction from Glass Furnaces

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Donald J. Keifer

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470312841.ch7

Proceedings of the 50th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 1,2

Proceedings of the 50th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 1,2

How to Cite

Keifer, D. J. (1990) Toxic and Acid Gas Reduction from Glass Furnaces, in Proceedings of the 50th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 1,2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470312841.ch7

Author Information

  1. United McGill Corporation 2400 Fairwood Avenue Columbus, OH 43207

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374894

Online ISBN: 9780470312841

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Keywords:

  • electrostatic;
  • precipitator;
  • emissions;
  • eliminating;
  • parameters

Summary

Glass production facilities present unique air pollution control problems. Emissions from many glass processes contain small particulate that is difficult to collect and handle. The overall composition of the off-take gas can vary greatly because of differences in processes, batch mixtures, and fuel qualities. As more is learned about the potential dangers of various off-take gasses, more regulations are being imposed to limit gas and particulate emissions.

Typical problem gasses include SO2 caused by high-sulfur fuel and batch material, HF when fluorine is used as a fluxing agent, boric acid when boric oxide is present in the batch, and formaldehyde caused by the heating of resins in wool glass in the forming and curing process. Many of these gasses can be converted to particulate or condensed so that they can be collected by an electrostatic precipitator, a system that has traditionally been used in the glass industry to collect particulate only.

This paper discusses reducing toxic gasses by using (1) a spray-dry scrubber and electrostatic precipitator, (2) dry injection and electrostatic precipitator, or (3) a wet electrostatic precipitator.

The task of finding the right air pollution control solution for a process is often complicated by a combination of political issues, performance regulations, equipment specifications, and permitting of equipment for toxic and acid gas reduction. Nevertheless, reliable equipment is available to satisfy realistic pollution control demands.